PRINTMAKING AS RESISTANCE

Often used to address social and political themes, the history of printmaking as a form of dissent is well documented. From protest posters to zines to leaflets, printmaking possesses the unique ability to disseminate information camouflaged as art.  Innately more egalitarian and accessible, and therefore less precious and valuable, the production of prints is often a community activity that can also easily enter the public sphere.

Screenprinting with the feminist art collective Tracers at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and Columbia College

Screenprinting with the feminist art collective Tracers at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and Columbia College

WHAT IS A PRINT?
“A print is a work of art made up of ink on paper and existing in multiple examples. It is created not by drawing directly on paper, but through an indirect transfer process. The artist begins by creating a composition on another surface and the transfer occurs when a sheet of paper, placed in contact with this surface, is run through a printing press. Among the advantages of making an artwork in this way is that numerous “impressions” can be made, because new pieces of paper can be sent through the press in the same way.” More information and interactive demonstrations of the four main types of printmaking can be found at the Museum of Modern Art website.

Printmaking shops at the City College of Chicago (Harold Washington College), Oberlin College, and Spudnik Press

Printmaking shops at the City College of Chicago (Harold Washington College), Oberlin College, and Spudnik Press

RESOURCES AND EXAMPLES:

SR.jpg
BP.jpg

BLACK PANTHER PARTY / interview with Emory Douglas, who guided most of party's imagery

JP.jpg
AC.jpg
LM.jpg